newsletter-jan2014.php

National Joint TERT Initiative
  
     
Issue: 17
January 2014
In This Issue of NJTI

NJTI Panels
TERT Panels in conferences  

Reserve TERT Accessories

 

TERT accessories are available for TERT related conferences. Shipping to your location will be free. The only cost to you will be the outgoing shipping you pay. Click Here for more details.

 

Display panels currently reserved for:

 

Nov. 14-15

Mission Statement

TERT Documents

  

Congrats to the new NJTI-TERT
Committee Members!

 
Cory Ahrens, WA
Brianna Fields, AR
Lisa Fulton, TN
Elizabeth Pierson, MO
 
 

Deployment Testimonials

   

NY-TERT

 

I would start by saying it was a great deployment and a great learning experience in many aspects: to learn from how other centers operate and to be able to learn from those we were deployed with. 

 

John Paffie

Emergency Services Dispatcher

Broome County Office of Emergency Services.

Motivational Corner

   

 

If Only You Could
  
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard.
You would weep like me.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard.

You would spend countless hours in your bed staring at the ceiling.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard.
Then you would cry for the woman who is losing her husband of decades.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard.
You would know that gunfire is always near.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard.
That house fire would not be so spectacular.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard
The lost child would be like one of your own.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard
That traffic stop would not be so routine.

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard
You would understand
  
Author Unknown

Committee Members/Volunteers
Members/Database
Christine Burke
Jim Tanner
Yolanda Callaway
Brianna Fields
Lena Gribb
Michele Blais
Violet Anderson
Cozett Davis
Training Committee
Christine Burke
Lisa Fulton
Linda Davis
Jesse Creech
Brianna Fields
D. Jeremy Demar
Diane Pickering
 Standard Committee
Lynnette Doyal
Brian Burgamy
Linda Davis
Kimberly Burdick
Cory James
D. Jeremy DeMar
Violet Anderson
Legislative Committee
Brian Burgamy
Kimberly Burdick
Website
Jim Tanner
D. Jeremy DeMar
Brian Burgamy
Newsletter
Lisa Fulton
Cristina Cabrera

Quick Links
  

Message from the Editor

Thank you for reading this issue of the NJTI Newsletter. Please feel free to contact me with any comments or suggestions.

 
Sincerely,
 
Cristina Cabrera
North Central Texas Council of Governments
616 Six Flags Drive, Centerpoint Two, Arlington, TX 76011
817-695-9155 ext: 7155
  
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   TERT TRAIN THE TRAINER
 

Maintaining the legacy of the TERT Basic Awareness and TERT Team Leader Course NJTI-TERT continues to support disaster preparation as a primary focus at all levels of government. Deploying to hurricanes, tornados and terrorist attacks on our nation, NJTI-TERT recognizes the need for TERT trainers to assure every state is able and ready when disaster strikes.

In September this year, NJTI-TERT worked with Texas TERT Trainers to develop the TERT Train the Trainer Course. The two (2) day course is targeted to roll out January 1, 2014. State Coordinators and their PSAP’s can request to host a Train the Trainer Course or if instructors meet the pre-requisites, TERT Members may request the course curriculum.

Course prerequisites include:

1)      Required:

a)      IS-144

b)      Basic TERT Awareness Course

c)      TERT Team Leader Training Course

d)      Certified Instructor (per your state guidelines)

2)      Recommended:

a)      Crisis Communications (equivalent)

b)      NIMS ICS 300, 400

c)      CISM (Critical Incident Stress Management)

 

The purpose of this course is to educate instructors who have already completed the TERT Basic Awareness and Team Leader Courses and allow them to use that expertise to teach these courses within or outside their own state.  

This is an instructor-level training course. Participants must check with their agency, regional, or State directors for specific deployment information and other policy/procedure mandates. This course is not designed to replace or substitute any established policy/procedure for your particular agency. At a minimum, participants should review and follow their individual agency’s policy/procedure.

 

We look forward to coming to your state,
 

Natalie Duran and Sherry Decker

 

           

Request for Testimonials
  

Have you participated in a TERT Deployment? Send a brief Testimonial, to be featured in one of the monthly newsletters to ccabrera@nctcog.org 

What’s Happening in Your State 

18 Deployable21 In Progress–11 Inactive
  

Training Schedule
  
  
Upcoming Training
  

WA-TERT is currently working on preparing Mission Ready Packages (MRP) for Emergency Management in order to assist in a timely response to requests and to cut down on deployment times.  The following training is scheduled:

  • TERT Train-the-Trainer:  December 18-19, 2013
  • TERT Team Member:  February 20, 2014 and June 2, 2014
  • TERT Team Leader:  February 21, 2014 and June 3, 2014

10 tips to stay mentally healthy

 

 

 

Enjoying mental health means having a sense of wellbeing, being able to function during everyday life and feeling confident to rise to a challenge when the opportunity arises. Just like your physical health, there are actions you can take to increase your mental health. Boost your wellbeing and stay mentally healthy by following a few simple steps.
 

  1. Connect with others. Develop and maintain strong relationships with people around you who will support and enrich your life. The quality of our personal relationships has a great effect on our wellbeing. Putting time and effort into building strong relationships can bring great rewards.
     
  2. Take time to enjoy. Set aside time for activities, hobbies and projects you enjoy. Let yourself be spontaneous and creative when the urge takes you. Do a crossword; take a walk in your local park; read a book; sew a quilt; draw pictures with your kids; play with your pets – whatever takes your fancy.
     
  3. Participate and share interests. Join a club or group of people who share your interests. Being part of a group of people with a common interest provides a sense of belonging and is good for your mental health. Join a sports club; a band; an evening walking group; a dance class; a theatre or choir group; a book or car club.
     
  4. Contribute to your community. Volunteer your time for a cause or issue that you care about. Help out a neighbour, work in a community garden or do something nice for a friend. There are many great ways to contribute that can help you feel good about yourself and your place in the world. An effort to improve the lives of others is sure to improve your life too.
     
  5. Take care of yourself. Be active and eat well – these help maintain a healthy body. Physical and mental health are closely linked; it’s easier to feel good about life if your body feels good. You don’t have to go to the gym to exercise – gardening, vacuuming, dancing and bushwalking all count. Combine physical activity with a balanced diet to nourish your body and mind and keep you feeling good, inside and out.
     
  6. Challenge yourself. Learn a new skill or take on a challenge to meet a goal. You could take on something different at work; commit to a fitness goal or learn to cook a new recipe. Learning improves your mental fitness, while striving to meet your own goals builds skills and confidence and gives you a sense of progress and achievement.
     
  7. Deal with stress. Be aware of what triggers your stress and how you react. You may be able to avoid some of the triggers and learn to prepare for or manage others. Stress is a part of life and affects people in different ways. It only becomes a problem when it makes you feel uncomfortable or distressed. A balanced lifestyle can help you manage stress better. If you have trouble winding down, you may find that relaxation breathing, yoga or meditation can help.
     
  8. Rest and refresh. Get plenty of sleep. Go to bed at a regular time each day and practice good habits to get better sleep. Sleep restores both your mind and body. However, feelings of fatigue can still set in if you feel constantly rushed and overwhelmed when you are awake. Allow yourself some unfocussed time each day to refresh; for example, let your mind wander, daydream or simply watch the clouds go by for a while. It’s OK to add ‘do nothing’ to your to-do list!
     
  9. Notice the here and now. Take a moment to notice each of your senses each day. Simply ‘be’ in the moment – feel the sun and wind on your face and notice the air you are breathing. It’s easy to be caught up thinking about the past or planning for the future instead of experiencing the present. Practising mindfulness, by focusing your attention on being in the moment, is a good way to do this. Making a conscious effort to be aware of your inner and outer world is important for your mental health.
     
  10. Ask for help. This can be as simple as asking a friend to babysit while you have some time out or speaking to your doctor (GP) about where to find a counsellor or community mental health service. The perfect, worry-free life does not exist. Everyone’s life journey has bumpy bits and the people around you can help. If you don’t get the help you need first off, keep asking until you do.

5 Minute Training
  
  
  

 

FEMA

Winter Storms & Extreme Cold

While the danger from winter weather varies across the country, nearly all Americans, regardless of where they live, are likely to face some type of severe winter weather at some point in their lives. Winter storms can range from a moderate snow over a few hours to a blizzard with blinding, wind-driven snow that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures and sometimes by strong winds, icing, sleet and freezing rain.

One of the primary concerns is the winter weather’s ability to knock out heat, power, and communications services to your home or office, sometimes for days at a time. Heavy snowfall and extreme cold can immobilize an entire region.

The National Weather Service refers to winter storms as the “Deceptive Killers” because most deaths are indirectly related to the storm. Instead, people die in traffic accidents on icy roads and of hypothermia from prolonged exposure to cold. It is important to be prepared for winter weather before it strikes.

Before Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

To prepare for a winter storm you should do the following:

  • Before winter approaches, add the following supplies to your emergency kit:
    • Rock salt or more environmentally safe products to melt ice on walkways. Visit the Environmental Protection Agency for a complete list of recommended products. http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/formulat/formpart.htm
    • Sand to improve traction.
    • Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment.
    • Sufficient heating fuel. You may become isolated in your home and regular fuel sources may be cut off. Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
    • Adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
  • Make a Family Communications Plan http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency.
  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or other local news channels for critical information from the National Weather Service (NWS). Be alert to changing weather conditions.
  • Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, keep a disaster supply kit in your vehicle.
  • Bring pets/companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
  •  

During Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

  • Stay indoors during the storm.
  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy, walkways.
  • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on a heart attack – a major cause of death in winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothing loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite. These include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia. These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion. If symptoms of hypothermia are detected, get the victim to a warm location, remove wet clothing, warm the center of the body first and give warm, non-alcoholic beverages if the victim is conscious. Get medical help as soon as possible.
  • Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. If you must drive: travel in the day; don’t travel alone; keep others informed of your schedule; stay on main roads and avoid back road shortcuts.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
  • If the pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
  • Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
  • Conserve fuel, if necessary, by keeping your residence cooler than normal. Temporarily close off hear to some rooms.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55 degrees F.
    After Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

  • Go to a designated public shelter if your home loses power or heat during periods of extreme cold. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).
  • Continue to protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing warm, loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in several layers. Stay indoors, if possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NJTI-TERT